COVID-19 in Arkansas

The COVID-19 pandemic is affecting people around the world, including Arkansans. ACHI will provide updates and insights on this evolving public health crisis.

What Cities and Towns Should Know During the COVID-19 Pandemic

ACHI and the Arkansas Municipal League hosted a video call on April 2, 2020, to discuss what cities, towns, and other state municipalities should know about the COVID-19 pandemic.

Defining COVID-19 Terms

We have launched a series of blog posts explaining key terms and phrases used by public health officials in discussions of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

PPE is vital in preventing the spread of infection to and from healthcare workers and their patients. As COVID-19 spreads, health systems in the U.S. and around the world have been overwhelmed by demand for PPE. Read More

Vectors

“Vectors” are defined by the World Health Organization as “living organisms that can transmit infectious pathogens between humans, or from animals to humans.” Read More

Contact Tracing

“Contact tracing” is defined by the World Health Organization as “the process of identifying, assessing, and managing people who have been exposed to a contagious disease to prevent onward transmission.” Read More

Wall of sticky notes, man pointing

Positive Cases of COVID-19 in Arkansas

This map, courtesy of the Arkansas Department of Health, displays the number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 by county. As of April 6, 2020, there are 875 total cases statewide, and there have been 16 deaths.

Click on counties to see more information.

In partnership with the Arkansas State Chamber of Commerce, ACHI is participating in weekly video calls to update business leaders from across the state on COVID-19 and address their questions. Watch the video above for the April 2 update.

Special thank you to Waymack and Crew for providing space and equipment for hosting the call.

Helpful Links and Numbers:

The Arkansas Department of Health (ADH) is tracking statewide cases, and more information can be found here.

The White House issued the President’s Coronavirus Guidelines for America – 15 Days to Slow the Spread of Coronavirus, which is available here.

The CDC posts regular online updates with latest guidelines and information on COVID-19.

 

COVID-19 Hotlines and Screening Information:

ADH: During normal business hours (8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.), urgent and non-urgent calls, please dial 1-800-803-7847 or email ADH.CoronaVirus@arkansas.gov. After normal business hours and weekend calls, needing immediate response, please call 1-800-554-5738.

UAMS: Click here for screening information, including drive-thru screenings and phone screenings. Their COVID-19 Hotline is 1-800-632-4502.

Arkansas Children’s Hospital (ACH): For children younger than 18 years old, call 1-800-743-3616. Nursing staff will be available for questions and phone screenings 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Click here for more information from ACH.

Free-for-All

This free-for-all model, produced by the Washington Post, shows how quickly a simulated disease can spread throughout a population of 200 people as they move about freely with no protective measures taken. This results in a lengthy steep curve as the disease spreads, which may have the effect of overwhelming the healthcare system if too many infected people experience severe symptoms at the same time.

Source: Washington Post, “Why outbreaks like coronavirus spread exponentially, and how to ‘flatten the curve,’” Harry Stevens, March 14, 2020. Retrieved from: https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2020/world/corona-simulator/

Attempted Quarantine

This Washington Post model shows an attempt at a quarantine of infected people to slow the spread of disease, or “flatten the curve.” Eventually, however, it proves very difficult to keep healthy people and infected people separated entirely and this method often proves ineffective in the long term. The following models from the Post show two forms of “social distancing,” which can be an effective method of slowing the spread of disease.

Source: Washington Post, “Why outbreaks like coronavirus spread exponentially, and how to ‘flatten the curve,’” Harry Stevens, March 14, 2020. Retrieved from: https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2020/world/corona-simulator/

Moderate Social Distancing

This model illustrates the effectiveness of moderate social distancing in flattening the curve. In this simulation, three quarters of the population practice social distancing — remain isolated in one place — while the remainder continue to move around. The spread of an outbreak is slowed considerably.

Source: Washington Post, “Why outbreaks like coronavirus spread exponentially, and how to ‘flatten the curve,’” Harry Stevens, March 14, 2020. Retrieved from: https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2020/world/corona-simulator/

Extensive Social Distancing

This model illustrates the effect of “removing the allure” of going out. For example, restaurants, bars, and movie theaters close to the public. Concerts and events are canceled. This results in even more people maintaining the practice of social distancing, and the spread of the simulated disease slows even further.

Source: Washington Post, “Why outbreaks like coronavirus spread exponentially, and how to ‘flatten the curve,’” Harry Stevens, March 14, 2020. Retrieved from: https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2020/world/corona-simulator/